Monday, 30 September 2013

EOY Prep!

Guys, As you study tonight, review Formal Letters and Factual Reports for Paper 1!

Wednesday, 28 August 2013

Classwork for 28 August

Hi guys, I am on MC today. Please work in your groups for next week's performance task. Make sure that your article is well developed by this point and does not exceed 600 words (minimum 450). Remember it must be centered around a controversy and have well-established viewpoints from different points of view in your topic area. Also, as you develop your newscast, keep in mind the scoring rubric that will be used and make sure your work is developed around those specific criteria. Your newscast should be done like the last one, but this time only focuses on the one main story your group has chosen. Thanks and have a good Wednesday. Mr. Arrowood PS- If your group has finished (which I don't think is the case for most of you), then do Task 2 from the handouts I gave you yesterday.

Thursday, 15 August 2013

Link for 15 August

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Ap4lfmWuiORydG03aHdjR3lmMm51NEVud1RPTFlqX1E&usp=sharing

Thursday, 25 July 2013

News Broadcast Project

In groups of 4 or 5, create a TV news broadcast. 

-Three anchors:
    -- Two for hard news
    -- One for soft news (choose one)

-One person in charge of video/graphics 

Anchors:

-Research a recent news story (local or international) and write a script of how you would present that story for a TV news broadcast. Your script should follow the guidelines we have discussed in the Features of a News Broadcast. In addition to the story itself, your script should include anything else you plan on saying (lead-in, sign-off, transitions) during the broadcast. You may use clips from YouTube of newscasts as inspiration.

Graphics person: 

-Create a Keynote with slides that you will show to supplement the anchors' stories. This means you will have to work with the anchors to decide what pictures, video clips (footage), and graphics you will use while they are reporting the stories. There should be at least one picture/background per story being reported.

The news broadcast must be at least 5 minutes in length and a maximum of 10 minutes
 

One person from each group must arrange for their group to be filmed while presenting. The news broad cast can also be pre-recorded if you have the time to complete this before class.

How long do we have?!

-You will have the rest of today's class period as well as all of tomorrow's class period to put together this presentation and rehearse it with your group. The presentations will occur the next lesson.

Friday, 19 July 2013

English Journalism Presentation (Luke, Ian, Jason, Priya)





Hard and Soft News-Ethan Reuben Nicholas







Slides For Presentation - Eunice & Gayvin & Yunshu










English Journalism Presentation






Minh Tri, Ming Hui, Thurga. Presentation.

We are journalists writing about the taxi driver that returned 70k to the owner. We believe this type of news is soft news, but it is a bit closer to soft news. It can be soft news as this would usually be more related to the taxi driver’s feelings and why did he return the money. It would be more of soft news as it goes to a personal level. It is more of an ethical issue and usually be linked to his reasons why he returned the 70k. It is not a hard news as it is not to the point, not mainly about giving data and precisely explain what happened. 
  • Our journal is about taxi driver returning 70k. to owner. 
  • Soft news 
  • Relate to driver’s feelings
  • Personal
  • Ethical issue. It is not a hard news. Cause it is not mainly about saying how much the driver returned, not straight to the point, but it goes really really deep.
We would develop the story by describing the story briefly and explain the situation. Then, I would interview the parties involved in the incident. I would ask questions related to feelings, emotions and thoughts. For example, I would ask the taxi driver, how did you feel when you found the money? I would try to ask all the persons involved, if possible. 
  • Describe briefly then explain.
  • Interview ALL parties involved.
  • Ask question related to emotions and thoughts, feelings.
  • Examples
For verification of facts, I would record the interview, either by audio or video and try to ask the person involved directly and not through secondary or tertiary sources. Our method of getting information would be mainly interviewing first person or referring to the pictures taken from news articles. I could try to take photos from other professional journalists and of course, I have to credit them for their photos. However, these things would be the last resort and should be used the last. We should try to get information on our own first before using others.

  •  Record interview audio or video
  • Ask directly, first person.
  • Try Primary Sources.
  • Take from other journalist. Of course must reference, credit.
  • Use your own information first.

English Journalism Presentation








Friday, 12 July 2013

Three of Seven Dilemmas Journalists face



http://www.mediafire.com/download/ue9n4z8js0wbpt3/Audio_Recording_34.aifc


Invasion of Privacy

The journalist is going to write an article on a famous singer. In order to make it more interesting, the journalist wants to get more information about the singer. The journalist than follows the singer around just to pry into the singer's private life.

Conflict of Interest

The journalist is going to interview a singer who is charged with drink driving. The journalist herself is a big fan of a singer and when she reports about the singer, she writes about the singer in such a way that the singer has no fault.


Plagiarism

The journalist is tasked to write about a famous singer. The journalist searches about the famous singer online and uses somebody else's information about the singer. The journalist does not credit the person who created the post. This is called Plagiarism.

3 Ethical Dilemmas That Journalist Face- Reuben Ang

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfSn2XWNFmw&feature=youtu.be

Script:
Offending or distasteful content
The purpose of being a journalist is to report news and share it with the world. If a journalist discloses information that is deemed offending or distasteful, how would the offended party or person feel? If somebody does not know anything or does not have any background information about the news that he is watching, that person might have a bad impression of the offended person and might make some wrong judgement.

Invasion of privacy
Well, there definitely is a line between invading somebody’s privacy and interview people or witnesses. They are humans too. They need some privacy, some time to rest with the comfort of being alone. Singers are a good example. As obvious as it seems, singing is their job. It is definitely a very tiresome one. When journalists keep going to them and question them about their profession, they won’t get their rest period. They have family and friends to they have to spent time with too, just like you and I.

Commitment to accuracy
The task and purpose of being a journalist is to relate facts to the public or audience. If the information that the journalist report is not true, what is the purpose of following the news? Usually, journalist report false information because they want to make the news sound interesting and exciting so more people will buy their news and as a result, earn more money.

Seven ethical dilemmas that journalists face

video



Ethical Dilemmas Podcast (Gavin)

video

Three of the Seven Dilemmas Journalists face - Wai Yan


video

Script
Hi everyone! I am Wai Yan from S2-05 and today I am recording a podcast (an audio one evidently) to explain some problems or dilemmas Journalists of today face, especially the ethic-related problems/ issues.

Like I said, journalists have a 'code of conducts' that they have to follow. it 's not a lawful thing or whatever (except for some though) but it's something ethical, something really "humane". This codes consist of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm (on anyone), being independent as well as being accountable.

With this 'Code of Ethics', there comes problems and journalists face some perplexity or dilemmas. There is a group of ethical dilemmas that are rather commonly faced by journalists at many points of their time in their life as journalists. It is e known as the "Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face". There are seven of it as stated in the header, varying from 'conflict of interests', 'plagiarism', 'anonymous sources', 'offending or distasteful content', 'invasion of privacy', 'bias' and 'commitment to accuracy'.

In my opinion, the most important of these seven is the writers 'commitment to accuracy', 'plagiarism' and the journalist's wrong usage of words. 

Starting with the very first one, the writer's commitment to accuracy is to me, one of the most important, or might very well be THE most important of the three, ultimately the seven. A journalist's very main job is to deliver to you information which is true, or in other words, correct and precise information. So if the factor of accuracy is compromised in the information or resources he delivers, is that still journalism? I don't think so and this is why I feel that this factor is of utmost importance to the other factors as it determines a journalist whether he is a 'legitimate' journalist or not, as it determines the definition of journalism. Always remember, not publishing information is almost always better than publishing inaccurate information.

Coming up second, plagiarism is a very serious offense, especially in the aspect of journalism. As members of society, we have learn to acknowledge other's work and not STEAL them. It's important to the point that even students are required to follow as well.

And lastly, the most basic but important factor of the seven is the journalist's usage of words. It's perfectly fine when the journalist uses the right (good) ones but it becomes an issue when he don't. This is because as a journalist, you are required to be formal (not literally though) in the sense that you have to know how to talk or so called 'communicate' with the mass public. Not using vulgarities or profanities or just inappropriate language is a clear example. 

That's all for now. Thank you.


Three Ethical Dilemmas Journalists face

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8OHrUxFRmT-Y3JDamVUbHJPNm8/edit?usp=sharing

Hello, i am Jason Low from S2-05 and today i will be talking about three ethical dilemmas that journalists would face.

Firstly, i would to say that this is purely my opinion and it might be wrong.

The three ethical dilemmas that i will be talking about today is Invasion of privacy, Conflict of interest and Bias.

Invasion of privacy is where a journalist would say peep through the windows of a celebrity's house just to take a few shots of the person. On the other hand, if a celebrity went to the beach and was showing more skin than usual, that isn't an invasion of privacy as the beach is a public place where anyone can go. The celebrity may request that the photos be deleted as it does not show the person in a good manner, but the option of deleting the photos would be left up to the journalist.

Conflict of interest is when a journalist would change details about the story without affecting the main point of it. An example would be if a journalist was asked to cover a story about a certain company in the the stock market that was recently losing money, and that reporter is heavily invested in a the company’s stock, it might change how he/she writes about the company.

Lastly bias, one example would be in the case where a journalist was asked to cover a story about two different companies but he/she might favorite one more than the other, this would affect the story. Thank you!

Three of Seven Ethical Dilemmas (Isabella)

Audio Recording - http://www.mediafire.com/download/kqnq9shqrd818fu/Audio_Recording_4.m4a

Three of the Seven Ethical Dilemmas-- Netraa

https://docs.google.com/a/s2012.sst.edu.sg/file/d/0B508NLlR2qbSUHFnNmJNcXhGemM/edit


The first one I chose is Bias. Bias in journalism is when the journalist does something in favour of the person they might know. When someone has bias on someone during journalism, they would give the more positive comments towards the bias which would make the person not at fault look bad. In journalism everyone should be treated fair and truthfully.  

An example is when I am a journalist and I am someone who knows the person who is at fault very well. I would give positive comments towards the person who is at fault and make the other person look bad. This is called as bias.

The second one I chose is offending or distasteful content. Offending or distasteful content   means when someone says something offending in the story which should not be known to the viewers or the public. So the journalists would have to cover it up or think of a another way to say it not such that it is offending or distasteful. 

An example is when I am a journalist and I interview the person, the person says something offending or distasteful out of anger during the situation. I would have to cover it up or change it somehow that when it reaches the public or the viewers, it would not be offending to the public or the viewer. This is called as offending or distasteful content.

The third one I chose is conflict of interest. Conflict of interest is when the journalist is a close friend of the interviewee. So the point of view towards the interviewee would be postive.


An example is when I am a journalist and I am the best friend of the person who I am interviewing, I would give positive comments about them such that no one would know the truth. This is called as conflict of interest.

Ethical Dilemms Podcast (PriyA)

Script for English Journalism

Plagarism
Conflict of Interest
Bais

Plagarism is something like stealing. You take the work of another person and take the credits for yourself. This is definitely not the right thing to do because the person who took so much of trouble ends up not getting credited for what he did.
For example: If someone goes to Egypt to take a picture for a particular newspaper exclusively. Then another person uses the picture and says that they took it by themself. Then the person who risked his life ends up not getting the credit for what he did.

Conflict of Interest is basically something like favouring someone. So for example when we are tasked to interview someone who we know, we might actually end up writing a story by favouritizing them. We should ensure that that does not happen

Bais. For example if a reporter is the supporter of a particular political party then the other parties would end up being in a disadvantage because the reporter would be able to so- called brain wash its readers. video

3 most severe Dilemas POdcast. ( Minh Tri)

Download my Podcast here


Seven Ethical Dilemma Journalists Face 

The first is conflict of interest. 
It is doing anything that might compromise objectivity in the reporting of truth.
Example:
A journalist putting his country in good light and talk about other countries but his country was actually in the wrong.

The second is invasion of privacy.
Reporters must consider the consequences of publishing the outstanding news value photo or naming someone in an article. 
Example:
Taking pictures of celebrities without their permission.
The third is commitment to accuracy. 
Journalists should not be careless in their work as it may affect people’s reputation. The rush to be first, prized today and available to anyone now with the Internet, is not justification for not checking out data, informations and sources.
Example:
A journalism information that was published was wrong.

http://www.mediafire.com/?s302m8ywpks8620

Three of Seven Dilemmas Journalists Face - Clemens

http://www.mediafire.com/download/n5m8mne9nqp6idt/Ethical_Dilemmas_journalists_face.mov

ETHAN PODCAST

video


https://dl-web.dropbox.com/get/Audio%20Recording%203.m4a?w=AACOwhwxOWkRsyPmZT74J7ERbv2bxSrrFUoC3iv60v2cEQ

Three of Seven Ethical Dilemmas (Marcus)

video

Marcus Chan S2-05

Script for 7 Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face
Hello everyone, my name is Marcus from S2-05 and I’ll be talking about 3 of the seven ethical dilemmas journalists encounter as they go about doing their job. Firstly, I’ll be talking about Invasion of Privacy. Many journalists, when doing extensive coverage on a certain person may tend to delve too deep into the person’s personal life. For example, journalists may follow someone extensively and perhaps to a beach where they might want to suntan. The journalist may then take photos of that person and this could a gray area because on one hand the beach is a public place and it could be argued that it is not an invasion of privacy because they have decided to suntan in an area where it is accessible and obviously beaches are places where we tend to shed more skin. However, on another hand, the person could argue that the photos taken were suggestive or portrayed him or her in a bad way and it was the fault of the journalists who took those pictures. 

So next. I’ll be talking about being bias. People tend to be suggestive and the way they read or see certain things can shape their perception into a bias towards or against someone. As journalists it is crucial that we investigate both sides of the story so that we can have reasons as to why a person did such a thing and why someone would have reacted in that way. An example could be in the elections. Since Straits Times is a government owned newspaper, they could feature more of the PAP’s candidates and make them out 

Finally on to the last part, a commitment to accuracy. Journalists always want to get the scoop first as they will then be able to publish before anyone else. An example would be a journalist rushing to a crime scene and interviewing a person who was caught up in it. The person interviewed could say that he heard hundreds of shots being fired when in actual fact perhaps the criminal only had one gun with a few bullets. The journalist could believe him and publish it quickly and obviously something with more action and shots fired in that context would be more interesting. 


So that’s the end of this video and I hope everything wasn’t too boring for you guys. 

Three of Seven Dilemmas Journalists Face - Eunice

Link: http://www.4shared.com/music/XOkQysLU/Audio_Recording_2.html

Script:

So hey guys, today I’ll be talking about 3 Ethical Dilemmas Journalists face!

The first one would be conflict of interest! But what is conflict of interest? It is when you’re interviewing or reporting about somebody you have contact with. It’s like interviewing your friends, family members or even people you do not like basically, people who you know. But so what if you know them? Conflict of interest is when you interview them and start doing things that compromise objectivity in the reporting truth. 

For example, you are reporting about a recent case about theft and it so happens that the victim is your highschool bestfriend. Since it’s your highschool bestfriend, you’ll probably side with him or her and make it seem that your highschool bestfriend is definitely innocent and have no faults in this case even though it may not be true. You’’ll do your best to report good stuff about your highschool bestfriend and may even bring down the accused which is pushing away the truth. This is known as conflict of interest. 

So lets move on to the second ethical dilemmas journalists face!

The second one is none other than Invasion of privacy. Just by the 3 words you probably can guess what it is all about. As a journalist, you’ll have to respect people and know when to not cross the line which could invade into people privacy. You’ll have to get your information the legal way and not invade into people privacy just so you can get the ‘juiciest’ news. The consequences of Invasion of privacy can be very deadly as you’ll probably get sued by the victim and be criticised by the public for not knowing simple and basic rules of being a journalist

For example, you are in charge of interviewing a celebrity and rumors has been said that she was getting married to a guy 10 years younger than her. Of course you interview her however she chooses to not give any comments. Instead of stopping there, you invade into her privacy by following her home secretly and peeping into her window just so you can get a picture of her and her secret boyfriend who she was going to marry. Such things like that do happen in real life, most of it done by the paparazzi themselves, which has received many criticisms for their lack of respect in people’s privacy.

Moving on to the last one! 

The last one is known as being bias. Being a journalist, you need to be fair and impartial as possible. Ever issue has more than one side, it is your job to get both sides to be represented as much as possible. Just because you are bias to one of the parties, it is absolutely wrong to cover more of their area and cover very little on the other party. It is actually obvious when journalists are bias to one of the parties thus the consequences will also not be pleasant when the public starts to question the reports written by all the journalists in that company

Just to give a short example, it is the election period and Group A is going against Group B. You were given the task to interview both of the parties and update on the current news affair concerning the election. Just because you liked and voted for Group A, you choose to cover more on Group A’s news affairs and make them sound interesting and as for Group B, you cover very little and they only appear at a small section on the page of the news paper compared to Group A. This is showing bias-ness which is very inappropriate in my perspective as I think that as journalists, it is important to be professional and have equality. 

And there you have it, 3 Ethical Dilemmas Journalists face!

Thursday, 11 July 2013

Ethical Dilemmas Podcast (Luke)




Plagiarism


Plagiarism is like stealing someone's work as your own without crediting.

For example, i'm a journalists, and i'm writing about an increase in dengue cases. I would have to get the numbers and data from somewhere but i submit my work without proper credits of where my data or information was taken from.

Bias

Being bias is being one-sided or unfair.

Theres a website called IGN who reviews games and movies which is known for being somewhat biased. They always seem to give good reviews of this certain company's games when the users themselves disagree and give lower ratings. A lot of people think its because this company is pretty rich.

Invasion of Privacy

An invasion of privacy is basically intruding into someone's personal life perhaps without their consent.

For example, i'm a journalist again, and it seems that theres a new popular singer. To get a good story and good pictures, i go all out to the extent of following the person and taking photos of them everywhere including inside their house.

Three of Seven Dilemmas Journalists Face

Three of Seven Ethical Dilemma Journalists Face 

The first is conflict of interest. 
It is doing anything that might compromise objectivity in the reporting of truth.

Example:
A student journalist interviewing only his friends from the same class instead of other classes or levels. 

The second is invasion of privacy.
Reporters must consider the consequences of publishing the  outstanding news value photo or naming someone in an article. 

Example:
Posting videos of a celebrity without asking their permission. A celebrity is rumored to be going to secluded places for unknown reasons. Journalists should not hide cameras at suspected places. 

The third is commitment to accuracy. 
Journalists should not be careless in their work as it may affect people’s reputation. The rush to be first, prized today and available to anyone now with the Internet, is not justification for not checking out data, informations and sources.

Example:

A journalist writes that Brand K instant noodles has some kind of toxic added but it was actually Brand U instant noodles instead. 

Three of the seven ethical dilemmas journalists face

To view the podcast, click link above. *Do connect Music Player for Google Drive to your google drive or download it. 

Lim Ming Hui


A conflict of interest is when you are somewhat related to the person you’re interviewing/ reporting/ journaling about. How can you be related? Be it financial, like bribery, or a family member or a friend, as long as you’re somehow in contact with that person/ know that person more than a stranger, you’re related. Why? Because when you actually know the person, versus someone you’ve never heard of before, you’ll be likely to side with the one you know better, and explore more in his ‘area’ - that is, somewhat related to the next topic, bias. 

Bias is something like conflict of interest, but not completely alike. Bias is taking sides with a party, being unjust. There has to be 2 sides to the story, and one should not try to point fingers before being able to see for both perspectives. 

I’ll be combining conflict of interest and bias. Okay, here’s the thing. Let’s say your very good friend is a well-known celebrity, who is undergoing a divorce with her husband because of an ‘affair’. Not knowing about your relationship with her, the TV news has asked you to cover her as a reporter. Should you reject the offer? You should, because since you’re her very good friend, you’ll try to make her sound as great as possible, but,  her husband would be at a disadvantage.

Commitment to accuracy, is, checking and editing the article. For one, or more, careless misleading information, could be make the situation even more serious, or on the otherhand, on a lighter tone. 

“TBD reporter Amanda Hess reported that ‘one in three black men who have sex with me is HIV positive’. She meant to say ‘one in three black men who have sex with men’. Although it’s not unusual for an occasional typo to slip through, however one should instead acknowledge their mistake and correct it, rather than pretend nothing happened and move on with it”

“TBD’s efforts to acknowledge the typo shows how a news organization can stand by it’s commitment to accuracy and turn a mistake into an opportunity to gain credibility.”


Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face

I think the most important is being biased. When a journalist is being biased towards for example a particular political party, people tend to get brain-washed and eventually vote for that particular political party. As for the other competing political parties they are at a great disadvantage.

- PriyA

Ethical Dilemmas Podcast (Yun Shu)

video

My notes:

THREE of the Seven Ethical Dilemmas of journalism
Bias
-being unfair and prejudiced.
-journalists should not have favoritism towards a certain party.

For example, i’m a journalist writing for a fashion magazine. I personally like a certain brand, so i praise their goods and hardly mention about the others. even if i do, i won’t praise them as much as the brand i like.

that is what i feel is a possible scenario.

Invasion of privacy

-something like taking a  photo or recording in the person’s personal space, house etc.
-but on the other hand if the person did it in public and it was recorded, it is not really considered invasion of privacy as it was not taken in their personal space. but it is not very moral to do so.

for example, if i’m a reporter reporting about a rumor that a famous actor is dating an unknown person, just to get a bigger scoop, I go to the actor’s house and install hidden cameras at the windows and take photos and videos of what is going on in the house. then with the information i got, i publish an article revealing who is the person.

Plagiarism
-using other people’s work and naming it your own

For example, i’m a journalist writing for a science magazine. One of the topics i cover is on the recent haze. because i can hardly find any information on haze, like what are the components in the haze etc. i use another book’s information in my article. I re-write it using the exact information just that i change a bit of the grammar, but majority of the information was from the book. then i sign off as myself without crediting the author of the book.
That was an example of plagiarism and it is illegal to do so, the owner may sue the other party.

Ethical Dilemmas Podcast Instructions

Ethical Dilemmas Podcast Instructions

Choose THREE of the Seven Ethical Dilemmas and create a podcast (audio or video) explaining these dilemmas and coming up with specific scenarios for each one.

The focus should be on determining moral grey areas and if the scenario is a violation of ethical standards or not.

Come up with scenarios of your own creation, not from past news stories or the internet.

There is a time limit of 2 minutes MINIMUM—no maximum. If you write a script, please upload that with your video/audio podcast to the class EL Blog.



When completed, upload to the class EL blog BEFORE  your next English class.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Luke

I think the most severe dilemma is invasion of privacy.  The right to privacy is a human right. Privacy is important because it helps people maintain their individuality. If a person requests something to protect their privacy like asking to be anonymous, the journalists should adhere to their request(s).

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Ethan

In my opinion, the 5th rule, invasion of privacy is the most distasteful, as it can potentially affect a person who might not have done much wrong, and might have put people in a bad light. Also, in some cases in might be illegal and is not profesional and as before, it might potentially cause seriously distress to people filmed or who had their photos taken.

Wednesday, 10 July 2013

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Isabella

To me, I feel that the most severe dilemma is invasion of privacy. There is a line that cannot be crossed when reporters are trying to get a news coverage and as humans we all have rights to have our own privacy. Journalists should respect this fact and be careful not to cross the line even by a little bit as this will result in very bad consequences. For example not keeping a person anonymous even if he or she wishes to is a form of invasion of privacy.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - (Wai Yan)

Journalists have a 'Code of Ethics' in which they have to follow to really be regarded as one. This 'Code of Ethics' includes areas of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently as well as being accountable. It's not a unlawful crime to not fulfill this code but it sure is in the journalist's world, where journalists are required to be ethically right as they deliver information to others. With this 'Code of Ethics', there comes problems and journalists face some perplexity. There is a group of ethical dilemmas that are rather commonly faced by journalists at many points of their time in their life as journalists. It can be known as the "Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face". There are seven of it as stated in the header, varying from 'conflict of interests', 'plagiarism', 'anonymous sources', 'offending or distasteful content', 'invasion of privacy', 'bias' and 'commitment to accuracy'. It may seem as if all are equally matched in terms of importance or they are meant to be, but in my views, there is one which is able to rule out all of the rest. It is nothing other than the journalist's commitment to accuracy.
A journalist's very main job is to deliver to you information which is true, or in other words, correct and precise information. So if the factor of accuracy is compromised in the information/ resources he delivers, is that still journalism? I don't think so and this is why I feel that this factor is of utmost importance to the other factors as it determines a journalist whether he is a 'legitimate' journalist or not, as it determines the definition of journalism. Always remember, not publishing information is almost always better than publishing inaccurate information.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Jason

I find that as a journalist, the worst dilemma would be conflict of interest as it would be hard to separate the writer's own feelings and what the truth is. An example would be if a journalist was asked to cover a story about a certain company in the the stock market that was recently losing money, and that reporter is heavily invested in a the company’s stock, it might change how he/she writes about the company. Even if it doesn’t affect the story. Whats more, if the readers discovers about it, it could raise doubts about anything else he/she wrote in that area. Currently, newspaper and magazines companies have been trying to reduce such issues and certain journalists would also go to the extreme of not voting in the presidential elections, just for the sake of avoiding a conflict of interest if he/she is making a report about it.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - WenFeng

To me the worst dilemma is Biasness. Biasness cause you to feel in favor or preference towards a particular thing and usually comes at the expense of other things.  It may be applied to people, situations, and various other circumstances.  Being biased may also mean being one-sided as a person may prefer a certain thing over the other regardless of seemingly good points.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Eunice

I feel that the most severe ethical dilemma is offending or distasteful content. As a journalist, sometimes it seems impossible to run a story without offending, insulting or displeasing someone however there are still moments when journalists must learn to not cross the line. Journalist have the responsibility to know how to present their information to the public in a professional, polite way which will enable all members of the public to read it without taking any offense by the remarks made. Even the smallest offensive remarks presented by the journalist can be a mountain out of a molehill as members of the public are usually quite sensitive over some topics. For example, religion. No matter how minor the insult or offense is, it can cause a huge argument which may escalate into a larger scale. Unwanted and maybe unnecessary problems will stir up thus creating a huge burden not only to the journalist himself/herself but also the company and the people around them. 

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face (Clemens)

To me the most severe dilemma is biasness because if you know or like someone you might be inclined to help them out and portray them in the right light. This is extremely important that journalists are not biased to anyone and keep a neutral position.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Ian

I personally think the most severe one is biasness. With enough said, the biggest thing about it to me is that it can really affect a great deal in small or big affairs. With it, it could influence and implant ideas or viewpoints that highlight a certain party's better side. This could especially be a great deal in presidential elections. It would affect the entire country or even the world and cause a great deal of damage if the journalist's bias party did something disastrous.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face (Yun Shu)

I feel that the most severe ethical dilemma is "Commitment to accuracy". The main purpose of a journalist is to report accurate information to the public. If the information is not even accurate or trustworthy, hardly anyone will read it. Furthermore, the inaccurate information might cause harm to some innocent people.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face (Marcus)

Offending or Distasteful Content
I feel that uploading offending or distasteful content the most severe. Although it is impossible to post an article without offending anyone as by taking a stand on a certain topic, our very viewpoint and opinions could be in a sense 'offending', it is important when to stop and filter content. The reason why is because an article written can be read by almost anyone and when journalists make certain remarks which may insult someone however minor it is, it can cause offense which may escalate into a larger scale. This is especially true when journalists discuss about religion and race as they border along the lines of giving his opinion and something that offends that religion or race. When it blows out into a larger scale, this may result in many unwanted problems.

Marcus :D


Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face-- Netraa (02)

I think that Bias will be the worse. When someone has bias on someone during journalism, they would give the more positive comments towards the bias which would make the person not at fault look bad. In journalism everyone should be treated fair and truthfully. 

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face - Reuben Ang

I personally feel that "Commitment to accuracy" is the the most unethical thing to do. The task and purpose of being a journalist is to relate facts to the public or audience. If the information that the journalist report is not true, what is the purpose of following the news? Usually, journalist report false information because they want to make the news sound interesting and exciting so more people will buy their news and as a result, earn more money.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face

In my opinion, the most severe ethical dilemma journalists face is Invasion of Privacy.

If the journalists take pictures or videos of someone without their permission and then post it, they may get embarrassed and/ or humiliated. Due to his/her actions, they may suffer severe consequences and at the worst case scenario, they may get fired and lose their job.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face

6. Bias.

Content should be fair and not judged, or having the story swung to the other party. The viewer has to know the full story so that he/she may judge for themselves who is the wrong/ guilty/ what actually happened.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face

I think the most severe ethical dilemma would be Invasion of Privacy.

If the journalists publicizes information of a person without the person's permission, the person will be humiliated. The person might not few comfortable with his/her information being let known to the public. By publicizing information without someone's permission, the journalist can get sued for invasion of privacy. The journalist can be dismissed from his/her job after being charged with Invasion of Privacy.

Seven Ethical Dilemmas Journalists Face

The most severe ethical dilemma would be Invasion of Privacy.

If a journalist takes and posts inappropriate photos of whoever they are interviewing, with out the person's permission, the person will get humiliated. The journalist can be sued or charged for invasion of privacy. Depending on how severe the situation is, the journalist will receive a warning or even lose his jobs. Journalists like this make us feel that our privacy is threaten.